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For immediate release: Ambassador Moses Responds to U.S. Climate Plan

on June 25, 2013

New York, 25 June–In response to the details of the U.S. climate plan released this morning, Ambassador Marlene Moses, Permanent Representative to the United Nations for Nauru and Chair of the Alliance of Small Island States released the following statement:

“U.S. President Obama’s announcement represents a positive step on climate change and we hope it translates into even more constructive engagement at the international climate negotiations, particularly when it comes to dramatically reducing greenhouse gases in the next few years, which is essential to keep the seas from washing over some of the world’s lowest lying island nations.

“However, we are painfully aware that coastal erosion, ocean acidification, degraded reefs and fisheries, droughts, floods, and relentless storms represent the new normal for many vulnerable communities. Therefore, any adequate response to climate change must also address permanent losses and damages stemming from the crisis.

“We look forward to working with the U.S. on this critical aspect of the negotiations to ensure that the international climate conference in Warsaw at the end of the year fully addresses the life-altering changes that have already been caused by climate change and many more that will be impossible to avoid.”

End

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